Saturday, July 21, 2018

A “How To” on Using Cut-Down 120 Film in a 127 Camera That Has a Red Window and Makes 4x3cm or 4x6cm Images - by Luke Taylor

This article shows a way to use 120 film that has been cut down using the technique that directly transfers the full length of 120 (film and backing paper) straight to a 127 spool for use in 4x3cm and 4x6cm 127 film cameras that use one (4x6cm) or two (4x3cm) red windows for frame alignment. While the 4cm frame spacing of a 4x4cm camera can use the same frame numbers printed on the 120 backing paper (16 frames), there doesn’t seem to be an easy way to use cut film in the 4x3 or 4x6 cameras. Here is a method that may be worthwhile. 

With this technique we will only align the first frame using the red window. After that we will blindly rotate the advance knob a predetermined number of degrees for each frame. The number of degrees rotated will be different for each frame. This is because as more film accumulates on the takeup spool, the bigger diameter it will get, and less rotation required to get the same amount of linear film movement. 
 
To aid in rotating the advance knob with a fair amount of precision and no tools we will need to do the following. 
 
1. Put a sticker on the advance knob. 
2. Draw a line that cuts it in half and repeat until 8 equal segments have been formed. 

 
3. When spooling the film, mark the paper where the film element starts.
4. Load the camera with the cut and respooled film and advance until you see the mark made earlier in the red window. Then, using good judgment, advance an amount more that will position the film element for the first shot. This is the last time you will use the red window. 
5. Use the chart below to advance the film for each frame.  You will rotate the advance knob by the “Fullturn” amount followed by the “Segment “ amount. 
 
Table for 4x6cm frames:
Frame     FullTurns     Segments 
1-2               2                 4.5
2-3               2                 2.5
3-4               2                 0.5
4-5               1                 7.5
5-6               1                 6.5
6-7               1                 5.5
7-8               1                 5.0
8-9               1                 4.0
9-10              1                 4.0
10-11             1                 3.0    
 
For example, to advance from frame 2 to frame 3, rotate the knob 2 full turns plus 2.5 segments.

I currently have not tried this in a 4x3cm camera yet, but I assume you could simply divide the “Fullturn” and “Segment” numbers in half. If you try it out, please share the results!
 
- Luke Taylor



Sunday, July 15, 2018

Hope for ReraPan...

Breaking news - a screenshot of a Twitter page, from an anonymous source ...


I'm hopeful... I'll keep you posted on further developments (so to speak) as I hear of them.

Saturday, July 14, 2018

Thursday, July 12, 2018

Happy 127 Day!

Happy 127 Day!

I hope you're having a fantastic time making 127-format photos today.

©J. M. Golding, To begin with hope; northern California, USA; Kodak Brownie Fiesta, Kodak Verichrome Pan, expired 12/75, http://www.jmgolding.com

Wednesday, July 11, 2018

Tomorrow is 127 Day!

Tomorrow, Thursday, the 12th of July, is 127 Day!

127 Film Photography will feature 127-format photographs made on July 12, 2018, in a special exhibition. You're invited to participate!

No fees, no competition, just a friendly virtual community joining together to make 127-format photos on  July 12, 2018.

To show your work,
  1. Take 127-format photographs on  July 12, 2018.
  2. Send one of your photographs from July 12 to 127 Film Photography. Please email one jpg file, 500 pixels wide, to 127filmformat ~at~ gmail.com, by September 12, 2018. (That's a month longer than previously - hopefully this gives everyone enough time to get their film developed and scanned).
  3. In the subject line of your email, type "July 2018 127 Day."
  4. In the body of the email, please include the copyright symbol, your name, the title of the photograph, location, camera and film types, and your website address (or other link to your work). In that order. Please follow this example (you don't have to use initials if you prefer to be known by your full name!):

    ©J. M. Golding, Silently spoken, northern California, USA, Yogi Bear 127 camera, Rerapan, http://www.jmgolding.com  

All types of 127 film format are welcome, whether the film began its existence as 127, or you used 35 mm film in a 127 camera, or you respooled 46mm film, or you cut down 120 film to 127 size ... or maybe you have a technique that I don't know about yet - if so, please tell me so I can share it with others who love this format (with full credit to you, of course - or perhaps you'd like to write a short article for 127 Film Photography about it!). Photos made on 127 film in a different size camera are welcome too.

127 Film Photography will publish all photos received (as long as they are in 127 format and do not contain images of nudity, violence, or exploitation).

I look forward to seeing your 127 Day photos!

Thursday, July 5, 2018

One week till 127 Day!

July 127 Day is only a week away! It takes place on Thursday, the 12th of July (that's 12/7 in European).

127 Film Photography will feature 127-format photographs made on July 12, 2018, in a special exhibition. You're invited to participate!

No fees, no competition, just a friendly virtual community joining together to make 127-format photos on  July 12, 2018.

To show your work,
  1. Take 127-format photographs on  July 12, 2018.
  2. Send one of your photographs from July 12 to 127 Film Photography. Please email one jpg file, 500 pixels wide, to 127filmformat ~at~ gmail.com, by September 12, 2018. (That's a month longer than previously - hopefully this gives everyone enough time to get their film developed and scanned).
  3. In the subject line of your email, type "July 2018 127 Day."
  4. In the body of the email, please include the copyright symbol, your name, the title of the photograph, location, camera and film types, and your website address (or other link to your work). In that order. Please follow this example (you don't have to use initials if you prefer to be known by your full name!):

    ©J. M. Golding, Rain on the tree, northern California, USA, Yogi Bear 127 camera, HP5+, http://www.jmgolding.com

All types of 127 film format are welcome, whether the film began its existence as 127, or you used 35 mm film in a 127 camera, or you respooled 46mm film, or you cut down 120 film to 127 size ... or maybe you have a technique that I don't know about yet - if so, please tell me so I can share it with others who love this format (with full credit to you, of course - or perhaps you'd like to write a short article for 127 Film Photography about it!). Photos made on 127 film in a different size camera are welcome too.

127 Film Photography will publish all photos received (as long as they are in 127 format and do not contain images of nudity, violence, or exploitation).

I look forward to seeing your 127 Day photos!

Tuesday, July 3, 2018

Community question: Cutting down 120 film to 127 size - what size, exactly?

I'm delighted to share 127 Film Photography's first community question.

As noted on the Submit to 127 Film Photography page, 127 Film Photography welcomes readers' questions. All readers are invited to offer responses to the questions that are posted - let's work together as a community!

From Alessandro Lisci:

I have a question that I have not yet resolved, about the size to which I should cut 120 film. In the videos and  articles I've seen, it seems to me that the 120 film is cut to the exact size of the 127 film spool. But the original 127 film is slightly smaller than 127 backing paper (a difference on the order of 1-2mm). Doing a test with the only developing tank in my possession that has a spiral (reel) for 127 film, I realized that the measure is almost exact, and a film even slightly larger would give me problems in loading the spiral. I wonder if it's a general problem, or it's my tank that has a minimal tolerance.
- Translated by Google Translate, with editing by J. M. Golding
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Io ho un dubbio che non ho ancora risolto, a proposito della grandezza in cui tagliare il film 120. Riguarda questo: Nei filmati e negli articoli che ho visto, mi sembra che il film 120 venga tagliato alla grandezza esatta del film-spool del 127. Però  il film 127 originale, è leggermente più piccolo della carta che lo protegge dalla luce (una differenza nell'ordine di 1-2mm). Facendo una prova con l'unica tank di sviluppo in mio possesso che abbia una spirale per il film 127, mi sono accorto che la misura è praticamente esatta, e un film anche leggermente più grande mi darebbe problemi nel caricamento della spirale. Mi chiedo se sia un problema generale, o la mia tank che ha una tolleranza minima.