Friday, December 7, 2018

Thursday, December 6, 2018

Tomorrow is 127 Day!

Tomorrow, December 7 (12/7), is 127 Day!

127 Film Photography will feature 127-format photographs made on  December 7, 2018, in a special exhibition. You're invited to participate!

No fees, no competition, just a friendly virtual community joining together to make 127-format photos on  December 7, 2018.

To show your work,
  1. Take 127-format photographs on December 7, 2018.
  2. Send one of your photographs from December 7 to 127 Film Photography. Please email one jpg file, 500 pixels wide, to 127filmformat@gmail.com by January 7, 2018.
  3. In the subject line of your email, type "December 2018 127 Day."
  4. In the body of the email, please include the copyright symbol, your name, the title of the photograph, location, camera and film types, and your website address (or other link to your work). In that order. Please follow this example (you don't have to use initials if you prefer to be known by your full name!):
©J. M. Golding,  Trail and contrail, northern California, USA, Yogi Bear 127 camera, HP5+, http://www.jmgolding.com


All types of 127 film format are welcome, whether the film began its existence as 127, or you used 35 mm film in a 127 camera, or you respooled 46mm film, or you cut down 120 film to 127 size ... or maybe you have a technique that I don't know about yet - if so, please tell me so I can share it with others who love this format (with full credit to you, of course - or perhaps you'd like to write a short article for 127 Film Photography about it!). Photos made on 127 film in a different size camera are welcome too.

127 Film Photography will publish all photos received (as long as they are in 127 format and do not contain images of nudity, violence, or exploitation).

I look forward to seeing your 127 Day photos!

Friday, November 30, 2018

One week till 127 Day!

December 127 Day is only a week away! It takes place on Friday, December 7 (12/7).

127 Film Photography will feature 127-format photographs made on  December 7, 2018, in a special exhibition. You're invited to participate!

No fees, no competition, just a friendly virtual community joining together to make 127-format photos on  December 7 , 2018.

To show your work,
  1. Take 127-format photographs on   December 7 , 2018.
  2. Send one of your photographs from  December 7 to 127 Film Photography. Please email one jpg file, 500 pixels wide, to 127filmformat ~at~ gmail.com by January 7, 2018.
  3. In the subject line of your email, type "December 2018 127 Day."
  4. In the body of the email, please include the copyright symbol, your name, the title of the photograph, location, camera and film types, and your website address (or other link to your work). In that order. Please follow this example (you don't have to use initials if you prefer to be known by your full name!):
©J. M. Golding, Autumn unfurled, northern California, USA, Yashica 44A, Portra 160NC, http://www.jmgolding.com
 
All types of 127 film format are welcome, whether the film began its existence as 127, or you used 35 mm film in a 127 camera, or you respooled 46mm film, or you cut down 120 film to 127 size ... or maybe you have a technique that I don't know about yet - if so, please tell me so I can share it with others who love this format (with full credit to you, of course - or perhaps you'd like to write a short article for 127 Film Photography about it!). Photos made on 127 film in a different size camera are welcome too.

127 Film Photography will publish all photos received (as long as they are in 127 format and do not contain images of nudity, violence, or exploitation).

I look forward to seeing your 127 Day photos!

Saturday, November 17, 2018

Wednesday, November 7, 2018

One month till 127 Day!

December 127 Day is only a month away! It takes place on Friday, December 7.

127 Film Photography will feature 127-format photographs made on December 7, 2018, in a special exhibition. You're invited to participate!

No fees, no competition, just a friendly virtual community joining together to make 127-format photos on  December 7, 2018.

To show your work,
  1. Take 127-format photographs on December 7, 2018.
  2. Send one of your 127-format photographs from December 7 to 127 Film Photography. Please email one jpg file, 500 pixels wide, to 127filmformat ~at~ gmail.com, by January 7, 2019. (Hopefully a month will be enough time for everyone to get their film developed and scanned).
  3. In the subject line of your email, type "December 2018 127 Day."
  4. In the body of the email, please include the copyright symbol, your name, the title of the photograph, location, camera and film types, and your website address (or other link to your work). In that order. Please follow this example (you don't have to use initials if you prefer to be known by your full name!):

    ©J. M. Golding, untitled, northern California, USA, Yashica 44LM, HP5+, http://www.jmgolding.com

All types of 127 film format are welcome, whether the film began its existence as 127, or you used 35 mm film in a 127 camera, or you respooled 46mm film, or you cut down 120 film to 127 size ... or maybe you have a technique that I don't know about yet - if so, please tell me so I can share it with others who love this format (with full credit to you, of course - or perhaps you'd like to write a short article for 127 Film Photography about it!). Photos made on 127 film in a different size camera are welcome too.

127 Film Photography will publish all photos received (as long as they are in 127 format and do not contain images of nudity, violence, or exploitation).

I look forward to seeing your 127 Day photos!

Saturday, October 20, 2018

Saturday, September 29, 2018

Hooge Crater, Ypres by David Miles


©David Miles, Hooge Crater, Ypres; Vest Pocket Autographic Kodak camera, c. 1915, Pan 400 127 Film, based on Ilford HP5. Developed using Ilfotec DD-X


Shots were taken in August 2018, WW1's centenary year. Although there are some light leaks, I was able to develop some shots. 

Within the grounds of the Kasteelhof 't Hooghe hotel in Ypres there is a small part of what once was part of the Hooge battleground. The area was regarded as a hazardous area for the infantry, where snipers abounded and trench raids were frequent. Both sides saw Hooge as a particularly important area and a key target for heavy artillery bombardment.

These trenches are left almost as they were. Shells lie piled up, barbed wire still in place. Large craters have been further dug out and left as a large pool. The Hooge crater was a massive explosion that took place in the area. There is a museum next to the hotel and a large cemetery called the Hooge Crater Cemetery. 4000 British soldiers lost their lives here on just one day.

Saturday, September 22, 2018

Saturday, September 15, 2018

127 Day Online Exhibition - 12th of July, 2018

Welcome to 127 Film Photography's 127 Day online exhibition! The images below were created in 127 format on the 12th of July, 2018.



© James Tappin, The Atom Tree, Rutherford Appleton Lab, Harwell Campus, Oxon, UK; Yashica 44,  Kodak Gold 200 (expired 1996, exposed at EI 50; there was a slip in the box saying that this was the last batch of Gold 200 that would be made in 127 format.)



© S. Busquets, Old Factory, new flats; Sabadell (Catalonia); Kodak No.0 Brownie, Ilford FP4 Plus cut down from 120 to 127


© Mika Morizaki, Suwa Taisha, Kanagawa, Japan; Rolleiflex 4x4 (pre-war 411, Rerapan100

©Nicholas Middleton, Hotel Landing; Liverpool, UK; Kodak Brownie 127, Ilford FP4 Plus


© Eben Ostby, Cement plant Nº 2; Oakland, CA, USA; Whitehouse Beacon II with flipped lens, expired Gevaert XL Pan (undated, probably early 60’s)


 © John Marriage, End of the Dream; Lyme Regis, Dorset, England; Topcon Primo-Jr (Metered version), Kodak Aerographic 2645



© S. Kaufman. Abandoned garden, Mattituck, NY USA; Komaflex, Konica 160 (expired 2007)


 ©Terry Byrne, Morning; New York, NY, United States; Rollei Baby, Ilford HP5+

©Mike Maguire, Claire; Washington, DC, USA; Detrola KW 127 camera, Kodak Tri-X 127 film (expired September, 1961)


©Luke Taylor, Kids on the porch; Ferrania RONDINE, Fuji Pro400H


©J. M. Golding, At the borderland of yesterday, Yashica 44LM, Ultrafine Extreme 100 (cut down from 120) 




Friday, September 14, 2018

ReraPan is back!

127 enthusiasts can rejoice -- ReraPan is available again, this time in 400 speed! Here's the page from Freestyle:


Tuesday, September 11, 2018

Tomorrow is the deadline to submit photos for the July 12 127 Day online exhibition

I hope everyone had a great 127 Day on the 12th of July!

This is just a friendly reminder that the deadline to submit your 127-format photo taken on July 12, 2018 tomorrow, Wednesday, September 12, 2018. Please remember to email one photo, as described here. Photos will be published in an online exhibition here at 127 Film Photography.

I look forward to seeing your photos!

Saturday, September 8, 2018

Friday, September 7, 2018

Please remember to send your photos from the 12th of July 127 Day

I hope everyone had a great 127 Day on the 12th of July!

This is just a friendly reminder that the deadline to submit your 127-format photo taken on July 12, 2018 is next Wednesday, September 12, 2018. If you have film that still needs to be developed, this would be a good time to do it :-) Please remember to email one photo, as described here. Photos will be published in an online exhibition here at 127 Film Photography.

I'm looking forward to seeing your photos!

Saturday, September 1, 2018

Family camping trip, Tawas, Michigan by Luke Taylor

I'm delighted to publish 127 Film Photography's first series, Family camping trip, Tawas, Michigan by Luke Taylor.


 ©Luke Taylor, Cut!!!; brown Yashica 44LM, Ektar 100

 ©Luke Taylor, Luke; brown Yashica 44LM, Ektar 100

  ©Luke Taylor, untitled; brown Yashica 44LM, Ektar 100

  ©Luke Taylor, Me 'n' Neva; brown Yashica 44LM, Ektar 100

©Luke Taylor, untitled; brown Yashica 44LM, Ektar 100

Saturday, August 18, 2018

Saturday, August 4, 2018

Tilting King Street Station by Jon Marmor

 ©Jon Marmor, Tilting King Street Station; Seattle, WA, USA; Baby Brownie Special, ReraPan

Saturday, July 28, 2018

Tic Tac Toe in the Sky by Jon Marmor

 ©Jon Marmor, Tic Tac Toe in the Sky; Seattle, WA, USA; Baby Brownie Special, ReraPan

Saturday, July 21, 2018

A “How To” on Using Cut-Down 120 Film in a 127 Camera That Has a Red Window and Makes 4x3cm or 4x6cm Images - by Luke Taylor

This article shows a way to use 120 film that has been cut down using the technique that directly transfers the full length of 120 (film and backing paper) straight to a 127 spool for use in 4x3cm and 4x6cm 127 film cameras that use one (4x6cm) or two (4x3cm) red windows for frame alignment. While the 4cm frame spacing of a 4x4cm camera can use the same frame numbers printed on the 120 backing paper (16 frames), there doesn’t seem to be an easy way to use cut film in the 4x3 or 4x6 cameras. Here is a method that may be worthwhile. 

With this technique we will only align the first frame using the red window. After that we will blindly rotate the advance knob a predetermined number of degrees for each frame. The number of degrees rotated will be different for each frame. This is because as more film accumulates on the takeup spool, the bigger diameter it will get, and less rotation required to get the same amount of linear film movement. 
To aid in rotating the advance knob with a fair amount of precision and no tools we will need to do the following. 
1. Put a sticker on the advance knob. 
2. Draw a line that cuts it in half and repeat until 8 equal segments have been formed. 

3. When spooling the film, mark the paper where the film element starts.
4. Load the camera with the cut and respooled film and advance until you see the mark made earlier in the red window. Then, using good judgment, advance an amount more that will position the film element for the first shot. This is the last time you will use the red window. 
5. Use the chart below to advance the film for each frame.  You will rotate the advance knob by the “Fullturn” amount followed by the “Segment “ amount. 
Table for 4x6cm frames:
Frame     FullTurns     Segments 
1-2               2                 4.5
2-3               2                 2.5
3-4               2                 0.5
4-5               1                 7.5
5-6               1                 6.5
6-7               1                 5.5
7-8               1                 5.0
8-9               1                 4.0
9-10              1                 4.0
10-11             1                 3.0    
For example, to advance from frame 2 to frame 3, rotate the knob 2 full turns plus 2.5 segments.

I currently have not tried this in a 4x3cm camera yet, but I assume you could simply divide the “Fullturn” and “Segment” numbers in half. If you try it out, please share the results!
- Luke Taylor



Sunday, July 15, 2018

Hope for ReraPan...

Breaking news - a screenshot of a Twitter page, from an anonymous source ...


I'm hopeful... I'll keep you posted on further developments (so to speak) as I hear of them.

Saturday, July 14, 2018

Thursday, July 12, 2018

Happy 127 Day!

Happy 127 Day!

I hope you're having a fantastic time making 127-format photos today.

©J. M. Golding, To begin with hope; northern California, USA; Kodak Brownie Fiesta, Kodak Verichrome Pan, expired 12/75, http://www.jmgolding.com

Wednesday, July 11, 2018

Tomorrow is 127 Day!

Tomorrow, Thursday, the 12th of July, is 127 Day!

127 Film Photography will feature 127-format photographs made on July 12, 2018, in a special exhibition. You're invited to participate!

No fees, no competition, just a friendly virtual community joining together to make 127-format photos on  July 12, 2018.

To show your work,
  1. Take 127-format photographs on  July 12, 2018.
  2. Send one of your photographs from July 12 to 127 Film Photography. Please email one jpg file, 500 pixels wide, to 127filmformat ~at~ gmail.com, by September 12, 2018. (That's a month longer than previously - hopefully this gives everyone enough time to get their film developed and scanned).
  3. In the subject line of your email, type "July 2018 127 Day."
  4. In the body of the email, please include the copyright symbol, your name, the title of the photograph, location, camera and film types, and your website address (or other link to your work). In that order. Please follow this example (you don't have to use initials if you prefer to be known by your full name!):

    ©J. M. Golding, Silently spoken, northern California, USA, Yogi Bear 127 camera, Rerapan, http://www.jmgolding.com  

All types of 127 film format are welcome, whether the film began its existence as 127, or you used 35 mm film in a 127 camera, or you respooled 46mm film, or you cut down 120 film to 127 size ... or maybe you have a technique that I don't know about yet - if so, please tell me so I can share it with others who love this format (with full credit to you, of course - or perhaps you'd like to write a short article for 127 Film Photography about it!). Photos made on 127 film in a different size camera are welcome too.

127 Film Photography will publish all photos received (as long as they are in 127 format and do not contain images of nudity, violence, or exploitation).

I look forward to seeing your 127 Day photos!

Thursday, July 5, 2018

One week till 127 Day!

July 127 Day is only a week away! It takes place on Thursday, the 12th of July (that's 12/7 in European).

127 Film Photography will feature 127-format photographs made on July 12, 2018, in a special exhibition. You're invited to participate!

No fees, no competition, just a friendly virtual community joining together to make 127-format photos on  July 12, 2018.

To show your work,
  1. Take 127-format photographs on  July 12, 2018.
  2. Send one of your photographs from July 12 to 127 Film Photography. Please email one jpg file, 500 pixels wide, to 127filmformat ~at~ gmail.com, by September 12, 2018. (That's a month longer than previously - hopefully this gives everyone enough time to get their film developed and scanned).
  3. In the subject line of your email, type "July 2018 127 Day."
  4. In the body of the email, please include the copyright symbol, your name, the title of the photograph, location, camera and film types, and your website address (or other link to your work). In that order. Please follow this example (you don't have to use initials if you prefer to be known by your full name!):

    ©J. M. Golding, Rain on the tree, northern California, USA, Yogi Bear 127 camera, HP5+, http://www.jmgolding.com

All types of 127 film format are welcome, whether the film began its existence as 127, or you used 35 mm film in a 127 camera, or you respooled 46mm film, or you cut down 120 film to 127 size ... or maybe you have a technique that I don't know about yet - if so, please tell me so I can share it with others who love this format (with full credit to you, of course - or perhaps you'd like to write a short article for 127 Film Photography about it!). Photos made on 127 film in a different size camera are welcome too.

127 Film Photography will publish all photos received (as long as they are in 127 format and do not contain images of nudity, violence, or exploitation).

I look forward to seeing your 127 Day photos!

Tuesday, July 3, 2018

Community question: Cutting down 120 film to 127 size - what size, exactly?

I'm delighted to share 127 Film Photography's first community question.

As noted on the Submit to 127 Film Photography page, 127 Film Photography welcomes readers' questions. All readers are invited to offer responses to the questions that are posted - let's work together as a community!

From Alessandro Lisci:

I have a question that I have not yet resolved, about the size to which I should cut 120 film. In the videos and  articles I've seen, it seems to me that the 120 film is cut to the exact size of the 127 film spool. But the original 127 film is slightly smaller than 127 backing paper (a difference on the order of 1-2mm). Doing a test with the only developing tank in my possession that has a spiral (reel) for 127 film, I realized that the measure is almost exact, and a film even slightly larger would give me problems in loading the spiral. I wonder if it's a general problem, or it's my tank that has a minimal tolerance.
- Translated by Google Translate, with editing by J. M. Golding
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Io ho un dubbio che non ho ancora risolto, a proposito della grandezza in cui tagliare il film 120. Riguarda questo: Nei filmati e negli articoli che ho visto, mi sembra che il film 120 venga tagliato alla grandezza esatta del film-spool del 127. Però  il film 127 originale, è leggermente più piccolo della carta che lo protegge dalla luce (una differenza nell'ordine di 1-2mm). Facendo una prova con l'unica tank di sviluppo in mio possesso che abbia una spirale per il film 127, mi sono accorto che la misura è praticamente esatta, e un film anche leggermente più grande mi darebbe problemi nel caricamento della spirale. Mi chiedo se sia un problema generale, o la mia tank che ha una tolleranza minima.

Saturday, June 30, 2018

Saturday, June 23, 2018

A strange (Bencini) Comet appeared in 1961 / Una strana (Bencini) Cometa apparsa nel 1961 - by Alessandro Lisci


In the early 1960s, Bencini launched a 127-format roller camera, which, like other models such as Tanit, Comet, etc, produced 3 x 4cm negatives. These models are immediately recognizable by the vertical viewfinder and by the presence on the back of two red windows on left and right,  instead of only one, in the center. The frame numbers on 127 film's backing paper are for square format (4 x 4 cm) exposures. However, with the Cometa, each frame number is used twice: first when the number appears in the first window, and again when the same number appears in the second window. Thus, with this 3 x 4 cm format there are twice as many exposures as are possible with the square format.



Although the Cometa shares this and other features (such as construction of aluminum alloy, meniscus lens, etc) with many other cameras, the Cometa is distinguished by some original (eccentric?) solutions that make it a slightly different camera.

If you hand the Cometa to someone who is not familiar with it, asking them to open the back to remove / load the roll, many people will turn it over in their hands, perplexed, looking for the lock / unlock button or the door hinge (I've made this test personally :). In fact, there is neither: to open and close the back you have to rotate the metal ring around the eyepiece of the viewfinder, and so you screw or unscrew the back of the camera on the camera body (which recalls the diopter adjustment of the viewfinder in some cameras ).
 

Other unusual solutions are the winding knob and the flash mount located on the bottom of the camera, while the upper part remains completely free.

In fact all the other controls, including the shutter release (a generously sized lever), are located on the lens barrel. In the style of these economical cameras in general, there are not many controls, but controls are not completely absent, as they are in some such cameras. The focus is adjustable (from 1 meter to infinity, turning the ring on which the distance scale is engraved), and with two levers (one at the top and one at the bottom) you can choose respectively between two apertures (f9 and f16) and two shutter speeds (1/50 and 1/100 of a second), plus a B setting (there is no threaded connection for a cable release,  present in some other inexpensive models with the classic metal shutter button on the top of the camera). Also on the lens barrel is a plug to which a flash cable can be connected.

Even the general shape is different and original: almost square, with a pleasant mix of rounded and angular lines, and centered above the lens, the large rectangular viewfinder.

The plastic parts on the right and on the left of the viewfinder, in which the words "Bencini" and "Cometa" appear, seem to imitate and allude to the presence of an exposure cell that actually is not there (not unusual in these inexpensive cameras, such as the Yogi Bear 127 camera).

As in many Bencini cameras, the lens consists of a single meniscus lens.

Produced only in the 1960s and not even for the whole decade, the Cometa is finally, among Bencini cameras, also a bit rare: Over several years, compared to many models Bencini (Koroll, Comet, and others), which I have run across several times, I happened to run into a Cometa only once (and I took it home ). Perhaps it is a comet with a rather long orbital period, like Halley's comet. If it appears to me again in the course of my life I will be able to establish it and update this page; otherwise try to check the old eighteenth-century documents, medieval, Chinese, etc., which speak of sightings.

In addition to direct observation, the source of historical information (in Italian) on the Bencini Cometa is these beautiful pages dedicated to the history of Bencini.
 - Written by Alessandro Lisci
translated by Google Translate, with a little help from J. M. Golding
--------------------------------------------------------------------

Agli inizi degli anni ‘60 la Bencini lanciò sul mercato un’altra fotocamera per rulli di formato 127 che, come altri modelli quali Tanit, Comet, etc, produceva negativi di 3x4cm. Questi modelli sono immediatamente riconoscibili dal mirino a impostazione verticale e dalla presenza sul retro di due finestrelle rosse invece che una sola, in posizione centrale. I numeri di riferimento sono infatti quello del formato quadrato (4x4cm) stampati al centro della carta protettiva del film, sul quale si scatta però due volte: una prima volta quando il numero appare nella prima finestrella, e una seconda volta quando lo stesso numero appare nella seconda; ottenendo così un numero di pose doppio rispetto a quelle possibili col formato quadrato.


Seppur la Cometa condivida questo ed altri elementi (come la costruzione in lega d’alluminio, lente a menisco, etc) con molte altre fotocamere, la Cometa si distingue per alcune soluzioni originali (stravaganti?) che la rendono una fotocamera un po’ diversa e particolare:

Se si dà in mano la Cometa a qualcuno che non la conosce, chiedendogli di aprire il dorso per togliere/caricare il rullino, molte persone la rigireranno tra le mani perplessi, cercando la serratura un pulsante di sblocco o la cerniera dello sportello (fatto il test personalmente:). Che infatti, non ci sono: per aprire/chiudere il dorso bisogna ruotare la ghiera metallica attorno all'oculare del mirino, e così si avvita/svita il dorso della fotocamera sul corpo macchina (cosa che ricorda la regolazione diottrica del mirino in alcune fotocamere).


Altre soluzioni poco comuni sono la manopola di avvolgimento e l'innesto per il flash posti sul fondo della fotocamera, mentre la parte superiore resta completamente libera.
 
Infatti tutti gli altri comandi incluso il pulsante di scatto (una leva di dimensioni generose), sono posti sul barilotto dell'obiettivo. Comandi che- nello stile delle macchine di fascia economica- non sono poi molti, ma non sono nemmeno completamente assenti, come in alcune. La messa a fuoco è infatti regolabile (da 1 metro all'infinito, ruotando la ghiera su cui è incisa la scala delle distanze), e con due levette poste una in alto e una in basso si può scegliere rispettivamente tra due diaframmi (f9 e f16) e due tempi di posa (1/50 e 1/100 di secondo), più la posa B (manca però l'attacco filettato per lo scatto remoto, presente negli altri modelli -anche economici- col classico pulsante di scatto metallico nella parte superiore della fotocamera). Sempre sul barilotto dell’obiettivo, vi è lo spinotto a cui va collegato il cavetto del flash.

Anche la forma generale è diversa e originale: quasi quadrata, con un mix piacevole di linee tondeggianti e spigolose, e in asse sopra l’obiettivo, il grande mirino rettangolare.

La parti in plastica a destra e a sinistra del mirino, in cui appaiono la scritta “bencini” e “Cometa”, sembrano imitare e alludere alla presenza di una cellula esposimetrica che in realtà non c’è (una cosa tipica in molte fotocamere di fascia economica), come non c’è nessuna indicazione sul semplice mirino di tipo galileiano.
Così come in tante fotocamere della Bencini, l’obiettivo è costituito da una singola lente a menisco.

Prodotta solo negli anni ‘60 e nemmeno per tutto il decennio, la Cometa è infine, tra le fotocamere della Bencini, anche un po’ rara:
nel corso di diversi anni, rispetto a tanti modelli Bencini (Koroll, Comet ed altri ancora), in cui mi è capitato di imbattermi più volte volte, mi è capitato di incappare in una Cometa solo una volta (e me la sono portata a casa). Forse è una cometa con un periodo orbitale piuttosto lungo, come quella di Halley. Se mi apparirà un’altra volta nel corso della mia vita potrò stabilirlo e aggiornerò questa pagina, altrimenti provate a controllare i vecchi documenti settecenteschi, medievali, cinesi etc, che parlano di avvistamenti.

Oltre a quelle derivate dall’osservazione diretta, le notizie storiche sulla Bencini Cometa hanno come fonte queste belle pagine dedicate alla storia della Bencini.

Saturday, June 16, 2018